Artisan Cheese Festival

March 13, 2018 | cheesetrail

California’s main cheese event happens next weekend, Friday, the 23rd thru the 25th, in Santa Rosa. For a cheese nerd, this hits all the right buttons.

On Friday, there are farm tours (including a stop at this writer’s own farm – Straus Home Ranchtickets are still available).

A Best Bite Competition where chefs and cheesemongers come up with their best ideas, pays tribute to those brave and hardworking, first responders of the recent fires.

On Saturday, industry experts instruct on pairings with charcuterie to beer and wine and how to judge cheese.

Then start your evening with a cheese and cocktail pairing.

On Sunday, you can start your morning with a cheese and bubbly brunch.

Then, besides the farm tours (which I LOVE), comes my own favorite event: the Sunday Marketplace. Here you meet 115 producers of cheese, wine, beer, ciders and other specialty foods. One ticket gets you access to tastes galore, including both current and new cheeses while meeting the cheesemakers themselves.

This year the festival has moved from Petaluma to the Santa Rosa Fairgrounds. But parking comes FREE with your ticket purchase.

To purchase tickets, click HERE.  See you there!

Why No Pig Milk Cheese?

February 4, 2018 | cheesetrail

Theoretically, pig’s milk should make great cheese. It’s got the fat (8.5%!), lactose and water as needed. 

But they only produce a gallon and a half of milk per day (as opposed to cows that give about eight). It takes a gallon of milk to make a pound of cheese. And then, pigs can’t become pregnant while they’re lactating; an economic downside.

But the real problem? Pigs have fourteen teats – yes 14! – as opposed to four for a cow and two for goats or sheep. 

And milk only comes out in fifteen second blasts (as opposed to 10 minutes for a cow).

So a fancy contraption that works in fifteen second intervals with fourteen attachments would need to be designed for a very small amount of milk.

There might be other cultural or religious reasons that pig’s milk and cheese haven’t made our breakfast table, but the conclusion is clear: Let’s leave that precious milk for the little piggies.

Get more cheese facts HERE.

Discovering Organic Cheese  

November 15, 2017 | cheesetrail

When was the last time you searched out organic cheese and what is it? And which cheesemakers in California make organic cheese?

Organic certification of cheese comes down to the animals, the ingredients and the method of processing; all overseen by the USDA National Organic Program. 

Animals must be raised without the use of antibiotics or hormones. All feed must be certified organic (organic pastures, and no pesticides or genetically engineered feeds). Animals must be allowed access to outdoors, including shade and sunlight, clean and dry bedding, and space for exercise (amount of access and pasture required is outlined and determined by region).  

If an animal is sick and antibiotics are the only solution to save the animal, organic regulations require that you save the animal, but then remove it from your organic herd. If this happens, farmers then sell their milk as conventional, or more likely, sell the animal itself.

 

The ingredients must all be certified organic as well. That includes both the milk and the enzymes (which create the curds). Chymosin, the ingredient produced naturally in the lining of a ruminant’s stomach and solidifies the milk and creates curds, is available as a genetically engineered ingredient. This genetically engineered enzyme is the most commonly used enzyme in cheesemaking.  As it is genetically engineered, it is not allowed in organic cheese. If you care about that, and you’re not sure if your cheese contains a genetically engineered ingredient, contact the company to inquire. Or, simply purchase organic cheese.

In processing, only cleaning agents that do not leave a residue are allowed to touch equipment or ingredients.

California organic cheesemakers include Cowgirl Creamery, Nicasio Valley Cheese, Organic Pastures and Spring Hill Jersey Cheese. Rumiano and Sierra Nevada also have organic lines of cheese. 

Organic cheese sales grew 15% a year between 2012 and 2015 and are now estimated to be around $570 million annually.

Want organic cheese? Look for the USDA Organic label. Questions about organic cheese?  Just ask!

 

 

Care for a bit of Cheese by the Lake?

September 13, 2017 | cheesetrail

I remember coming to Marin French Cheese Company as a child and drooling over their Breakfast Cheese, a tiny round of a young cheese.  It’s like they wrapped it, not quite finished (which can often be a very tasty time in a cheese’s life – depending on the cheese), and let us in on a tasty secret. At less than $4.00, it’s delicious and a great intro into the oldest continually operating creamery in the country.  Over 150 years old!

Then pick up some rustic bread, a salami or jam, some drinks (or they even pre-make sandwiches for you), and have your picnic on the lake just beside their shop and creamery.  

It’s a lovely lake surrounded by weeping willows. Perfect for the family, or dare I say it…romance.  

Inside their shop, you can also sample and buy their cheese as well as rounds from their partner company, Laura Chenel’s.  

Marin French is on the way to both Nicasio Valley Cheese Company (another creamery and cheese shop nearby) and Point Reyes. If you’re going for a hike or wanting to shop in Point Reyes, this is a good first stop along the way. 

Marin French is open 7 days a week, 8:30am-5:00pm. Nicasio Valley is also open 7 days a week, 10:00am-5:00pm.

Next Blog: What about that Mold?

How to Store Your Cheese

August 16, 2017 | cheesetrail

You just ate a bit of the cheese you brought home from the store. But what do you do with the rest?

First thing to know is, your cheese is ALIVE! Not like a scary monster, but essentially it does need to breathe. That’s why wrapping that leftover piece in plastic cling wrap is not such a great idea. You don’t want to suffocate it.

The best thing to do is wrap it in Formaticum paper, wax or parchment paper (wax paper is cheapest, so that’s what I use). Then you can actually put some plastic wrap over it OR put it in a plastic tub with a lid.  That way it is wrapped to keep it moist but also has air to breathe. This method works for both hard and soft cheeses. Then pop it in the vegetable drawer (the veggies provide a little moisture).

If your cheese starts to seem a bit dry, wrap it in a damp cloth (a clean one!) and place in a plastic tub. And if it’s too moist, then it just needs a bit more air.  

Keep stinky or blue cheeses wrapped and stored separately.

And, of course, if you have a fresh cheese like cottage cheese or cream cheese, leave it in the tub you bought it in, and re-seal it.  

If it’s a fresh mozzarella, change the water in it every couple of days.

The main thing to remember is to buy only as much cheese as you can eat in a week. Once cheese is cut into, like a wedge or a slice, it’s exposed to other bacteria in your fridge or air, and begins to degrade. So buy less, and eat more!

Next Blog: What to do about Cheese Mold

 

 

Should I Eat the Cheese Rind?

July 19, 2017 | cheesetrail

“Can I – or should I – eat the rind of my cheese?”  

Great question. And absolutely you can. Of course, it totally depends on preference.

It’s always easiest – and tastiest – to try the white fuzzy rind of a “bloomy rind” cheese like Brie or Camembert.  That’s natural. And believe it or not, that white matted exterior is actually the flower of the mold that helped create your cheese. I happen to love it. But, if you don’t like it, scoop out the interior and leave the rind behind.

The brownish orange of a stinky “washed-rind” is also edible. Go for it.

When it gets to the hard cheeses, it gets a bit more difficult. They can be tough to chew and very hard.  A cheese like parmesan, which has aged for a longtime, can be impossible to eat. But keep those rinds. Don’t throw them away. Toss them in a soup (or freeze them in a ziplock bag for future broths).

Some rinds are just plain tasteless. They may taste like cardboard, or be dusty. Feel free to dislike and discard.

But no rind will make you sick.

There is only one rind that you should avoid. It’s the wax rind of the Gouda and Edam, often glossy and colored red, used to protect the cheese. That’s wax, people! Do not eat it!

Next blog: How to Store Cheese.

 

 

 

 

Modesto Goats & Nuttiness – Nicolau Farms

June 13, 2017 | cheesetrail

Walter Nicolau of Nicolau Farms started with one goat. That turned into 200. As a descendant of Portuguese immigrants from the Azores who came to America and had a cow dairy, Walter had farming in his belly. He simply reinvented himself and the farm. His one Alpine goat, that turned into a flock, a trip, a tribe, a herd (all names for a group of goats), then inspired the making of some stupendously unique cheeses.

I taste a lot of cheese, but at least twice a year I discover one that blows my mind. Walter’s Bianchina does that for me. It’s a blend of cow and goat milk, creamy and addictive. Look for it.

Walter, along with his wife Elizabeth, and children, farms on 30 acres, grows hay and makes about a dozen different cheeses. Besides Bianchina, he makes the award-winning Capra Stanislaus, an aged and nutty goat cheese. I’m never one to use descriptives for cheese. I don’t really get all that. But I’m using the term “nutty” because that’s how Walter calls it. 🙂

But whether you know what “nutty” means when it comes to cheese or if you’re just plain “nutty” yourself, know that if you book ahead, Walter will explain it all to you, show you around the farm and creamery, talk cheese stories, let you taste and also purchase cheese to take home. His farm is just outside the town of Modesto, in the Central Valley, down a remote road. He prefers groups of six or more. After all, he’s got to save time to create more nuttiness. 

Click here to find where else you can purchase his cheese. And while you’re in Modesto, think about visiting Fiscalini Cheese as well.  I’ll talk about them next time.

The California Cheese Map is Out!

January 23, 2017 | cheesetrail

For the first time EVER, a map shows you every open cheesemaker in California. Address, hours and tour instructions included.

Traveling Highway 99 in the Central Valley? You’ve been passing some pretty great cheese.  

Gold Country? There are small, sweet farms waiting to show you around.  

Pick up fresh mozzarella and ricotta direct from a Los Angeles creamery.  

Travel the north coast and get a grilled cheese by the crashing waves.  

Pet a goat on the Central Coast.

The San Francisco Bay Area. Well, you knew it was all there, but maybe you didn’t know the specifics.  Now you do!

Download the map online, order a free copy to be sent to you, or if you’re a tourism office or business, pick up boxes of maps to hand out. 

The farms and cheese and cheesemakers are all waiting for you.

 

More to Monterey Than Jack

December 19, 2016 | cheesetrail

Guest Blog by Jenny Holt, Freelance Writer

More to Monterey Than Jack

When I was a child, my mom always told me not to eat any cheese before going to bed. She insisted that it would give me nightmares. But now that I am an adult and have eaten a lot of cheese, often with a glass of red wine, I can tell you the worst thing you will experience is a little indigestion. 

The friars of Monterey made their cheese back when the area was part of the Spanish Empire and then Mexico. But go a little ways north to between Watsonville and Salinas and you can brew a nice set of nightmares. There are a ton of haunted places and hikes across California as well as a full make-your-own cheese trail on CheeseTrail.org.

Follow the Cheese
First, the important bit – the cheese. The Watsonville-Salinas area has two great cheesemakers. First, you have the Schoch Family Farmstead on El Camino Real near Salinas. First farmed in 1944, the Schoch Brothers’ descendants still run the farm and is only 1 of 2 dairy farmers in Monterey County. They produce some excellent Monterey Jack, Mt. Toro Tomme, East of Edam, Junipero and Gabilan artisan cheeses which you can pick up at local stores and farmers market.

Just north of Wastsonville you have Garden Variety Cheese based at the Monkeyflower Ranch over on San Miguel Canyon Road, which specializes in dairy sheep cheese. Their products include fresh cheeses, aged cheeses, and yogurts such as Sweet Alyssum spreadable cheese, ricotta, Moonflower, and Black-Eyed Susan. They have a once a year open house with farm tour and BBQ.

And then Follow the Spooks
Start in Monterey, as it’s California’s original capital, and home to a fascinating combination of wrecked ships, exploring Spaniards, frontiersmen and strange goings-on. To maximize your chances of a scare, check out Gary Munsinger’s Ghost Trolly Tour on Wednesday and Saturday nights, or head over to sites such as Restaurant 1833, home to a fake doctor from England who had a stunningly high mortality rate including a Mexican Governor, before he committed suicide and his wife died upstairs. You can also find ghosts in the Monterey Hotel, Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo, Robert Louis Stevenson House and many other places about town.

However, if you want to stay closer to the Watsonville area, the Old Stage Road east of Salinas is said to be haunted and could be a good hiking spot. Further north there are haunted places such as the Veteran’s Memorial Building, which is said to be haunted by a little boy, and the Dusty Treasures Antiques and Collectibles housed in an 1899 mansion with a fine array of haunted antique objects, ghostly voices, footsteps, and slamming doors. Want to stay somewhere haunted for the night? Why not try the Bayview Hotel Bed and Breakfast in Aptos, which is said to be haunted by its former owners who died in a car crash.

Long Dream Farm – City Folk Change the Model

December 5, 2016 | cheesetrail

Not all farmers have always been farmers. Some of them have been “quants” (financial quantitative analysts) or corporate and immigrant attorneys. Well, that’s at least what Andrew and Krista did in their previous lives.

Six years ago they took their four children and decided to chuck life in New York City for a farm filled with heritage cows, emus, pigs, chickens, and dogs.  long-dream-cows
This farm, Long Dream Farm, is the only licensed dairy and farmstead creamery in Placer County, and can be called “back to the simple life, 2010s-style.”  Except that it’s a lot of work. The farm is near the town of Auburn in Gold Country.
long-dream-dutch-belted-with-calfAndrew and Krista have a vision. They’d like to prove that farming small-scale, keeping the cows with their calves and milking once a day, is sustainable.  They rotate their cows between 30 pastures every 2-7 days on about 370 acres over two farms.  

They’re idealists and I love that.

With the 1.5-3 gallons of milk they get daily from their milking cows (the rest go to their calves), they make ricotta, fromage blanc, panela, butter, yogurt, and ice cream.  Small batches. Charmingly small, handcrafted batches. They bring their goods to the weekly Auburn Farmers Market on Saturdays and a few of the local stores and restaurants.

long-dream-fromage-blancIf you’d like to see their farm in action, you can actually stay on site in a cabin and get up early to watch the cows being milked. Or email ahead for a tour.  It’s a lovely place with a really sweet family. And it’s hilarious to have the dogs follow you; one likes to carry his dog dish in his mouth.

long-dream-highland